Welcome to the Center for Science and Technology Policy!

CSTP’s goal is to strengthen and expand the community of researchers who study how governance, broadly construed, shapes the rate and direction of knowledge creation and technological change, and how science and technology, in turn, contribute to societal innovation. On our site, you can find out about the people and ideas that are helping to achieve that goal. Please join us by reading our work or attending an event.

What’s New?

2013 public policy Ph.D. graduate Tim Tian, now an assistant professor at Beijing Normal University, published “Brain circulation, diaspora and scientific progress: A study of the international migration of Chinese scientists, 1998–2006″, in the Asia-Pacific Migration Journal.

CSTP director David Hart has been named a senior fellow at the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation and will run an event and publication series on clean energy innovation during the 2016-2017 academic year.

CSTP co-director Connie L. McNeely was the organizer and co-host of the Symposium on the Science of Broadening Participation for the National Science Foundation in February 2016.

CSTP director David Hart has joined the National Academies’ Innovation Policy Forum as a co-chair.  The Forum acts as a focal point for a national and international dialogue on innovation policy.

2016 public policy Ph.D. graduate Marty Cohen’s paper “Impact of the HITECH Financial Incentives on Electronic Health Record Adoption in Small, Physician-Owned Practices” will be published in the International Journal of Medical Informatics.

In December 2015 in conjunction with colleagues from SRI International, CSTP hosted an agenda-setting workshop on behalf of NSF’s Science of Science and Innovation Policy (SciSIP) program on the theme “Making SciSIP Research More Useful to Policy-Makers.”  We briefed an interagency group on the report at the Executive Office of the President in June 2016.

2014 public policy Ph.D. graduate Ted Davis’s paper “High-skill return migration in the technology, medical, and academic sectors: the case of India and the USA,” was published in Diaspora Studies.

Photo of PhD Students Dana Dolan (right) and Yu Jin Jung (left) with Presidential science advisor Dr. John Holdren